The 1.7 THS Spondoolies Tech SP20 Jackson Bitcoin Miner With Lower Price

13 Nov
2014

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The Bitcoin ASIC manufacturer Spondoolies Tech is targeting the home miners with the new price of their 1.7 THS SP20 Jackson Bitcoin ASIC miner that is now available for a price of $795 USD with the November Batch 1 of the miner starting to ship on November 18th. The SP20 Jackson SHA-256 ASIC miner consists of 8 28nm Spondoolies-Tech RockerBox ASICs, comes with a dedicated Linux-based controller box that uses an Ethernet port for connecting the miner to your network. The miner does not come with a built-in power supply, you will need to add an external one that will be connected to the ASIC via 4 6-pin PCI-E connectors and it would need a minimum 1200W high quality PSU (1152 Watts actual power used according to the manufacturer). The one thing that is not very clear about the SP20 ASIC miner is what is he level of noise the cooling of the device produces (hopefully less than 60 Decibels), as in order to be suitable for home mining it should not be as loud as a server. Spondoolies Tech is probably not a know name for some of you as the company specializes in miners that are mostly used by larger mining operations and is also the supplier of some big cloud mining operations such as Genesis Mining for example. We suspect that the noise level at the listed power specification will not be very low, so do have in mind if you are interested in getting one of these to mine at home with.

For more information about the Spondoolies Tech SP20 Jackson November Batch 1 miner…



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4 Responses to The 1.7 THS Spondoolies Tech SP20 Jackson Bitcoin Miner With Lower Price

kev

November 13th, 2014 at 08:03

kev

November 13th, 2014 at 08:06

never mind i see its next months

malefactor

November 13th, 2014 at 14:21

Why would you ever buy this? calculators put this at earning 0.6 BTC over its useful life. Costs way more than that.

Scale doesn’t matter when what you are scaling is operating loss.

What the heck is the model for a datacenter scaled out with these? Resell hash power in small increments to a lot of people who can’t do math?

d

November 13th, 2014 at 19:59

@malefactor: I believe the thinking is that the price of bitcoin will rise. When the price of bitcoin rises, the cost (in terms of bitcoin) of running the device goes down, so you will be able to run the miner longer even if you are mining a smaller amount of bitcoin. Example would be: if it costs $3 to run a day in electricity (which is a set cost, unless you live in an area where the price of electricity fluctuates on a daily/weekly/monthly basis), that is equivalent to .007230 btc (at current $420 per btc) and you are making .02 bitcoin, which means you are netting .013 per day. But as everyone knows the difficulty will increase so you will be making less in two months time. Lets say after two months due to difficulty increases you are making .007230 btc per day, which if the price of bitcoin remains the same as it is when we started (i.e. $420) we are now netting 0 btc, which is no good. But if the price of bitcoin rises within those two months lets say to $600 then your $3 electricity cost is only costing you .005 btc per day, so you are netting .002230 and thus you will continue to run your miner.

There are a lot of “ifs” in there and as the price of bitcoin rises the difficulty will increase faster (more people wanting “in”), so that has to be taken into account too.

Maybe there is a bitcoin calculator that takes into account a moving bitcoin price, but the top three hits in google didn’t seem to have that ability. I wasn’t going to dig much deeper, because I’m not that big of a gambler… I’ll just purchase my bitcoin ;).

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