Testing the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 Founders Edition for Crypto Mining

24 Jun
2016

nvidia-geforce-gtx-1080-founders-edition

Recently we have tested the new Nvidia Pascal-based GeForce GTX 1080 Founders Edition GPU for crypto mining and it is now the time to see what the little brother in the form of GTX 1070 is also capable of. The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 Founders Edition is a little stripped down version of the current top model in the form of GTX 1080, but generally the two are not that different. The GPU on the GTX 1070 is a bit less powerful and the memory is regular GDDR5 instead of the GDDR5X used in the 1080. The cooling solution, the backplate, even the 8-pin power connector are the same on both and that should signal a good overclocking potential for the GTX 1070 and the significantly better price makes it the more interesting of the two for crypto mining. Do note that the TDP rating of the GTX 1070 is just 151W and the power limiter allows you for just 12% increase over the stock limit, so you get 169 Watts max without having to resort to something like BIOS modification for example in order to be able to get serious in terms of overclocking. We are going to cover the overclock for the GeForce GTX 1070 and the mining hashrate with OC in a follow up article, for now we are comparing only the performance at stock settings.

We have already discussed the not so good situation with Ethereum mining on the GTX 1080 and unfortunately things are the same with the GTX 1070. Mining Ethereum under Windows is pointless at this point as the hashrate is very low (issue with the video driver) and although this might be fixed at a later time with a driver update, for the moment the only option you have is Linux. The results under Linux are not great though the GTX 1070 apparently does perform better because of the GDDR5 memory even at lower frequencies as compared to the GDDR5X, especially when you overclock the GTX 1070. We are going to be doing some more testing for this under Linux at a later time in order to see what the new Nvidia Pascal-based GPUs are really capable of for mining crypto currencies based on the Dagger-Hashimoto algorithm like Ethereum, but for now we are focusing on the other algorithms.

geforce-gtx-1070-hashrate

The results we’ve got for other popular algorithms besides Ethereum’s Ethash are pretty interesting as you can see from our summary in the table. It is interesting to note that the GTX 1070 is a bit faster in all algorithms besides Decred than the GTX 980 Ti and it does it with a significantly lower power usage. Price wise the GTX 1070 is still a bit more expensive than GTX 980 Ti, but the power savings on the long term should more than justify the difference. With that said we should note that the GTX 980 Ti has never been one of the popular Nvidia video cards among miners due to the pretty high price that it has been keeping. Compare to GTX 970 the new GTX 1070 is significantly faster, and the results of the 1070 were not that close to the ones from GTX 1080 as we’ve hoped they could be. With some overclocking however we expect that the gap in performance between a stock GTX 1080 and the OCed GTX 1070 cloud become pretty insignificant, but that would need some more testing to confirm.

Do note that we have not included results from Lyra2RE and NeoScrypt this time, because with both algorithms the GTX 1080 and GTX 1070 did not perform well and would need some optimizations. In fact there is already an optimized version of ccMiner that fixes the performance issues with Lyra2RE that also brings quite big performance boost for older GPUs as well – ccMiner 1.7.6-r6 fork With Faster Lyra2RE, but for Neoscrypt the performance of the Pascal GPUs needs some work.



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2 Responses to Testing the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 Founders Edition for Crypto Mining

bilminer

June 24th, 2016 at 15:56

Thanks for this,….
when you do more tests please include the proper wattage, WITH and WITHOUT OC for each algo. This is especially important when comparing pascal vs polaris cards.

kanopt

June 26th, 2016 at 17:10

ethereum uses ethash not dagger-hashimoto… you maywant to edit that

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