Archive for the ‘General Info’ Category

We often get asked about hardware crypto wallets and what we would recommend and yet we have not covered that topic much, so it is about time we do it. There are pretty much 3 main products on the market that have been available for a while and have proven to be a reliable and most of all secure solutions for storing your crypto coins. These three manufacturers of hardware crypto coin wallets are: Ledger, Trezor and KeepKey and which of them you choose is often more of a personal preference.

The one we actually prefer and use is the Ledger Nano S, though the company also makes Ledger Blue, a more powerful, bigger and feature rich device that of course also costs more. We have not used or even tried the Blue model yet, so there isn’t much that we can talk about it at this point and it is also currently out of stock at the official website, so not easy to get at the moment. Anyway, one of the main reasons why we have opted out for the Nano S is the very compact size of the device, it is the smallest of all of the options with pretty much the size of a regular USB flash drive.

The Trezor wallet called also the Bitcoin Safe is the most common alternative of the Ledger Nano S, it is available in Black and White color and comes at almost the same price. Trezor is also working on a new improved model called Model T, though that one is not freely available for sale, currently still fulfilling pre-orders at the moment apparently. The Third option in the form of the KeepKey hardware wallet is probably the least popular of the three options, but that does not mean it is inferior to them. It is a bit different in how it looks, offering a more modern clean and sleek design and very similar functionality as the others at pretty much the same price point.

We are not trying to do a review of the different crypto hardware wallets covered here, we are just pointing the options available, so you can take a look at them and decide which one better suits your needs. Again, we use the Ledger Nano S, but that does not necessary mean that it will be the one you will like the best or that it will be the optimal solution for your needs. Just take a look at the available options and see what works best for you, they all work for all of the main crypto currencies, but there are some differences in the level of support of not so popular and newer ones.

What you need to be extra careful with is where you purchase your hardware wallet from, the best solution would be to go directly from the official website getting it from the manufacturer of the device. You can also check the list of official resellers and purchase from any of them, especially if you have a local company that sells them, just make sure they are listed as official reseller. It is not wise to look for a cheaper price and purchase from eBay or any other unofficial source as there could be unpleasant surprises that you get along with your hardware wallet. When you get the hardware wallet make sure it does not come pre-initialized with any printed security key or something like that, you need to initialize and generate the private key yourself on the device (if not sure you can always do a reset before you start). If the device comes already initialized (it should not come like that!) somebody else probably already has your private key and can use it to steal the coins you store and we are pretty sure you don’t want this to happen.

The craze for many forks from the Bitcoin blockchain has resulted in people trying to claim their free coins in various ways, the easiest one is to keep a local wallet and just export your private keys from the Bitcoin wallet and import them to the wallet of the fork. As a security measure it is always advised to first move your Bitcoin (or other coins) to a new address before trying to claim any kind of forked coins, this way you can be safe that your private keys used for the claim cannot be used for stealing your actual BTC. With the recent addition of official support for SegWit addresses it might be a good time to update your Bitcoin Core wallet, generate a new SegWit wallet address and move your coins these and then start claiming some forked coins with the old private keys.

How to export the private keys:
– Start your Bitcoin Core or other QT-walletwallet p
– Click on “Help” in the menu bar of the wallet
– Click on “Debug window” from the menu
– Select the “Console” tab to be able to type commands
– Unlock your wallet (if it is locked) with: walletpassphrase “your wallet password” 600
– Export the private key with: dumpprivkey “your Bitcoin address”
– Copy and keep safe the private key you will get for the respective wallet address you have typed
– Lock the wallet again with: walletlock

How to import the private keys:
– Start your Bitcoin Core or other QT-wallet
– Click on “Help” in the menu bar of the wallet
– Click on “Debug window” from the menu
– Select the “Console” tab to be able to type commands
– Unlock your (if it is locked) wallet with: walletpassphrase “your wallet password” 600
– Import the private key with: importprivkey “your Private key”
– You can check to see that a new receiving address has been added in the wallet
– Lock the wallet again with: walletlock

Make sure you import your private key(s) as soon as you start the local wallet for the fork in order to claim all of the coins properly, otherwise you might have to do a resync of the blockchain. Alternative solution would be to just copy the Bitcoin wallet.dat file, but then you might need to do a zapwallettxes and it can take longer time to claim if you have multiple wallets. Again, make sure you keep your private keys safe and do not share them or use them to try to claim coins unless you have already moved all of the coins to a new address prior to initiating the claiming process, otherwise there is a risk of loosing your BTC or other coins as there are scams out there posing as real forks that are trying to steal your coins. Even with legitimate forks it is always a wise idea to be on the safe side and never share or use a private key for a wallet that still have coins in it, just to avoid possible security risks.

Brave has announced that now Twitch streamers can also start to earn revenue in connection with the Brave browser and the Basic Attention Token (BAT). Brave has seen strong growth of new users and creators (including thousands of YouTube channels) after recent announcements and now it seems that it is time for Twitch streamers to join in with a new way to get supported by their viewers. For those new to Brave, it is a faster, more private browser that also includes Brave Payments, a built-in method of supporting content creators. The Brave browser is integrated with the Basic Attention Token (BAT) using the Brave Payments feature, so that audience members can give to support their favorite publishers, YouTube creators, and Twitch streamers using the crypto tokens.

The Brave browser lists the viewed Twitch channels in the Payments list, so that fans can donate tokens every month. Twitch streamers simply register as Brave Publishers to start receiving BAT contributions from Brave users. Twitch streamers can register their channel alongside other properties they may have (Web site, YouTube channel) as part of Brave‚Äôs multi-property support. Brave uses the Twitch.tv API to authenticate Twitch channels, after the streamer’s email is confirmed by the system. Once the verification process is complete and the streamer opens an account with Uphold, they can start receiving BAT contributions every 30 days.

To give the Brave browser a try and to check out the Brave Payments feature…


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