Archive for the ‘General Info’ Category

From time to time people tend to remember that they have minded BTC, LTC, DOGE or another of the earlier cryptocoins back in the day when they suddenly find an old wallet.dat file and then the problem with recovering the private keys and the coins in the wallet arises, we often get questions on how to do that. The easiest way would of course be to just copy the wallet.dat file in a new installation of Bitcoin Core or the respective local wallet and wait for the blockchain to sync in order to have access to any coins stored in the wallet. Int he case of Bitcoin however this is a slow process requiring you to download 150 GB of data (the whole blockchain), so alternative ways are being looked into and there are some that can be easier. One such way is to use the PyWallet Bitcoin wallet importer/exporter Python script that has been available for ages and that works great for giving you all your public and private keys from a wallet.dat file.

PyWallet however is a Python script that does require you to have Python installed and it requires an older version 2.7, so it will not work with the latest 3.x releases as there are changes that will prevent you from running the script. We are going to go through a short guide on how you can export your public/private keys from a wallet.dat under Windows here, the procedure for Linux is very similar as well. So you need to download and install Python 2.7 first, this is a Windows package of Python, there are no other dependencies to run the script under Windows. Then you need to install it in an easy folder like C:\Python27 for example, copy the pywallet.py script and the wallet.dat files in the same folder and then run the following command:

python pywallet.py --dumpwallet --datadir=.

If you have used the wallet for mining you may have more than just a few addresses inside, so you can use the below code to save the output into a wallet.txt file for easy use instead of just outputting it in the console window:

python pywallet.py --dumpwallet --datadir=. > wallet.txt

Just open up the text file and you will see a list of exported public keys (addresses) and private keys that were inside the wallet.dat wallet file. If you had the wallet encrypted you will also need to provide the password you used fr the encryption in order fro the data to be decrypted first. If you do not remember that password you have used to encrypt the wallet.dat file, well that would be a serious problem as recovering any coins inside the wallet has just become much harder that you though it could be.

You can use any block explorer for the respective coin to check if it has any balance inside by pasting your address (public key), so that you can be sure if there are coins or not in an address. If there are you can then just import the public/private key in a new wallet and then do whatever you want with the coins inside. Importing the key pair can vary depending on the wallet you choose to use, so check what is the procedure and make sure that you can import a wallet using the public and private key(s) you have just obtained using the PyWallet script.

There is also a more up to date fork of PyWallet available as well that offers some useful additional features, so you may also check it out if the original one does not do what you want it to, although the original one is perfectly fine for recovering the keys.

You might have seen a recent trend for new cryptocoins to appear with support for MasterNodes (MN) and the large number of such projects is also generating a lot of user interest. Keeping track of MasterNodes coins however and most importantly their status, including but not limited to profitability may not be that easy. Thankfully there are services that can help you in that by giving you easy access to all the information you need regarding MasterNode coins and one such is the MasterNodesOnline (MNO) that we like and use. Currently the service lists 134 different MasterNode coins with details about each of the coin such as its price, volume, market capitalization, coin requirements for a MN, number of active nodes, ROI and more. All of the information is available in an easy to use and functional clear interface, so you can quickly make check for profitability for example. So you might want to give the MNO website a go and see if you will find something useful there.

For the list of MasterNode coins provided by MasterNodesOnline (MNO)…

CryptUnit is an interesting new service offering up to date data for Cryptonote-based altcoins that you can mine, giving you profitability information along with more details about each of the supported coins. You just need to enter your Cryptonight hashrate and the service will calculate what is the most profitable coin to mine at the moment and give you some extra useful information such as pools and exchanges if you are not familiar with the coin. Of course profitability varies all the time, so things change and the most profitable coins vary all the time. Currently the service covers 16 different Cryptonote coins that can be mined with CPU or GPU (both AMD and Nvidia). The people most interested in this service are probably going to be the ones with AMD-based video cards especially RX VEGA 56/64 due to their very high mining performance especially in the Cryptonight algorithm.

To check out the CryptUnit web service offering Cryptonote mining profitability information…


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