Posts Tagged ‘Spondoolies-Tech


It is April 1st and companies that work with Bitcoins and other crypto currencies are releasing clever or not so clever new ideas or projects as a fun and engaging way to celebrate the day. Of course we are talking about jokes, not something real… or is it? We’ve collected some of the more interesting and fun April 1st Jokes here, so if you have not yet seen them do enjoy and remember, these are jokes and not real things or upcoming projects or products!

The BitPay Klondike is a car powered Bitcoin ASIC miner supposedly capable to provide users that get it installed in their cars with 400 GH/s hashrate being powered from the reclaimed kinetic energy generated by braking the car.
Newegg Introducing Own Cryptocurrency called EGGCOIN, the online retailer does accept Bitcoin as a form of payment, but they are actually not really launching their own egg-based altcoin.
ChangeTip SCAN is a device that will turn paper currency (fiat) to digital currency such as Bitcoin by scanning your dollar bills and exchanging them for Bitcoins and then destroying the physical bill, well not really.
Greece Will Adopt the Bitcoin, so apparently the finance minister of the country wants to move from Euro to Bitcoin, well, not really.
Bitreserve Introducing Adamantium and Orichalcum, the service really introduces some interesting new fictional precious metals.
Spondoolies-Tech SAT10 Mega CPU SHA256 Miner to be released in limited quantities, a special Intel NUC-based PC being able to achieve 100 TH/s SHA-256 hashrate using the CPU for mining with specially optimized mining software.
CoinDesk Launches Moon Bureau, the crypto currency news site is relocating their operations to the Moon and employees will be able to return back to Earth when the Bitcoin price passes the $5000 USD mark.


If you were early on the whole Bitcoin mining thing and were one of the first adopters of the Bitcoin ASIC miners when they started appearing you may still have some devices lying around that are generally not worth using anymore for mining. Well, maybe you just thought that they are not good for anything anymore, but there could still be some use for them, or at least if you want to test your luck “playing the lottery” for Bitcoin. The concept of Bitcoin lottery device was used along the announcement of the TechnoBit DICE Bitcoin ASIC miner, probably something that the marketing at Spondoolies Tech came up with as they are the actual manufacturer of the ASIC chips used inside the device. But aside from the DICE the concept to solo mine testing your luck to hit a BTC block yourself with a Bitcoin ASIC miner that is unprofitable if you mine at a pool sharing the profit with other miners might actually not be a bad one. It is risky and the chances are not that high thus the lottery reference – you may need a few months or an year and still get no block solved, but if you are lucky and manage to hit one, then you will get 25 BTC as a reward. Depending on the ASIC miner you are going to be using your chances might be better than actually playing the lottery, so you might want to give this idea a go.

The drawback that the use of an older and low hashrate Bitcoin ASIC miner as a “lottery device” is that you need to have a system that is always on and running a Bitcoin node, so that you can point your miner at it. Also setting up solo mining operation at home might not be the easiest thing for everyone, though if you already have and used Bitcoin ASIC miners you most likely should be able to do it. There is an alternative however, you can use a solo mining pool such as TBDice that was apparently prepared for DICE miners, but you can join in with any their miner as well. The idea of this pool is that you get to mine with the added convenience of a mining pool, but if you solve a Bitcoin block you will still get the full reward minus a small fee. Then again you may also decide to run the mining pool software yourself on your own website or a PC, you can get the CKPOOL source and use it – it is freely available. Do note that CKPOOL is designed to be used as a Bitcoin mining pool, but the concept of using your mining hardware as a lottery device applies to pretty much all other crypto coins as well, so you can test it with Litecoin for example or any other altcoin.

To check out the CKPOOL code if you are interested in running your own Bitcoin mining pool…


We are still playing with our hardware latest toy, the small TechnoBit DICE Bitcoin ASIC miner and today we were checking the cooling performance of the device. When we first saw the announcement the DICE was supposed to be a very silent miner as per the official specifications that stated (and still state) “Noise: ~20 DB at 25 °C ambient temperature”, however the moment we have turned on the unit a few days ago we knew this promise was not kept. If the noise level was just about 20 decibels than the DICE should’ve been so quiet that you would hardly know it is present and working in a quiet room. The reality is quite different though, our sound level meter has detected a noise level of almost 50 dBA and this is really quite noisy and a far cry from the promised noise. So we just had to take apart the device to see what fan it is using and also test to see if the case of the miner could be the culprit that is responsible for the very noisy operation of the DICE Bitcoin ASIC…


When we have opened the case of the ASIC miner we’ve discovered that the cooling fan used inside is a 92mm Evercool EC9225M12CA, a mid range fan that does 2200 rpm with about 1.8W of power usage. Apparently the fan itself was sufficient to cool the miner with its 39.35 CFM of air flow and interestingly enough the specifications of the fan do say less than 25 dBA in terms of noise generated. The fan itself was directly soldered to the pins of the 6-pin PCI-E power connector on the unit, there is no thermal control or variable rpm, it is working at maximum all of the time. Running the miner without its metal casing has show us that it can be quite silent indeed, so the cause of the noise apparently was the metal case of the miner. More specifically the holes at the fan air intake that apparently are responsible for the significant increase of the noise level, so when TechnoBit has promised us a silent Bitcoin ASIC miner they should have modified the case of the device, so that it can really be silent and not the opposite – make a case that will increase the noise level way over what was promised in terms of specifications.


The cooling of the single RockerBox ASIC chip that is at the heart of the DICE miner is sufficiently provided by two large aluminum heatsinks, one on top interfacing with a solid copper block to the ASIC chip and one at the bottom with direct contact to the whole surface of the PCB. There is enough thermal paste in between the heatsinks to provide good heat transfer and the not so powerful cooling fan has no trouble keeping the temperatures low, so that the about 100W of power used at the stock settings are not a problem. The device can also handle a nice boost in performance with some overclocking that is possible via parameters for the ASIC chip voltage and operating frequency, though you should be careful should you decide to clock the unit higher.


In the end we take a look at the operating temperatures of the DICE with the help of a thermal imaging camera, the thermal image you see above shows how hot the top and bottom heatsinks get while the device is working normally. We are getting close to 60 degrees at the top heatsink and a bit over 40 at the bottom at the hottest sports, do note however that the operating temperature of the Bitcoin ASIC chip under the heatsink should be higher with something like 10-20 degrees Celsius over the temperature we have measured on the heatsink. So if you decide to overclock the miner you should proceed with caution and monitor the operating temperatures as the power usage increases along with the hashrate when you increase the operating voltage and frequency of the Bitcoin ASIC chip.