Archive for the ‘Tests and Reviews’ Category

The former SUQA project, now SINOVATE (SIN), is about to hardfork in a couple of hours with numerous changes going into effect at block 170,000 that should be reached in a couple of hours time. With the hardfork there will be a new algorithm going into effect, switching from the old X22i to the new X25x algorithm for mining. The new algorithm is heavier and more memory intensive, so the hashrate you will be getting after the fork is gong to be lower with X25x compared to what you would be getting with X22i. There are already miners available for both Nvidia and AMD GPUs, you can find the expected performance below for GTX 1080 Ti and RX 580 8GB and as one would expect Nvidia is doing better for the new algorithm as well. Make sure you re ready for the hardfork by upgrading your wallet now, before the hardfork occurs… download the latest SIN wallet here.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti – T-Rex 0.11.0
– X22i: 18.85 MH/s (6x 113.12 MH/s)
– X25x: 2.31 MH/s (6x 13.83 MH/s)

AMD Radeon RX 580 8GB – WildRig Multi 0.17.3
– X22i: 5.08 MH/s (8x 40.71 MH/s)
– X25x: 0.74 MH/s (8x 5.93 MH/s)

Visit the official website for more information about the SINOVATE (SIN) project…

We have beeing playing for a couple of days with one of the new reference design Nvidia RTX 2060 video cards and tried how well it performs for crypto mining using various miners and mining algorithms and as expected with new GPU releases there is more to be desired, but more on that in a moment. We like the design and implementation of the whole cooling solution from Nvidia on their GeForce RTX 2060 Founders Edition cards, though there will be a lot of custom partner designs as well. The later should be available in a couple of days as well and start hitting the market pretty soon by the time Nvidia starts delivering FE cards in a couple of days. One thing that we don’t like very much with the latest RTX 20×0 series is the fact that the Founders Edition cards are only being sold directly by Nvidia and only available in a limited number of countries worldwide and the same goes for the RTX 2060 FE.

The Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 Founders Edition is equipped with a single 8-pin PCI-E power connector (up to 150W power) plus the maximum power provided by the PCI-E slot (max 75W) which should offer enough headroom for additional overclocking over the stock 160 W TDP (100%). You can go up to 118% TDP or about 189 Watts with a tool like MSI Afterburner on the FE. We are yet to play a bit more with the overclocking capabilities of the video card’s GPU as well as the onboard GDDR6 memory, even though the memory bus on the RTX 2060 is just 192-bit the fast 14 Gbps GDDR6 video memory still manages to provide pretty high memory bandwidth. The cooling solution and the fans are doing good job at keeping the video card at below 60 degrees Celsius operating temperature even under 100% load with 160W TDP with 30 degrees ambient temperature. The cooler is well built with high-quality and durable fans, so this should ensure long lasting and problem free operation as we are used to with FE cards unless there is some factory issue or a design flaw, something that unfortunately can always happen.

In the table above you can see some of our initial tests with various miners and using some of the different algorithms they support. As expected with the GPU releases the miners are not yet optimized or may even not support the new GPU at all like in the case of Bminer that spits out an error regardless of the algorithm. Other miners tend to crash on certain of the supported algorithms when ran on the RTX 2060 with the default settings. Since it is a new GPU after a bit of time we can see additional performance boost when the new video cards hit the market and miner developers get access to them and start playing around. For now the new RTX 2060 does not seem very attractive for crypto mining, but hopefully soon it will be better supported and offer even better hashrates. Until we also see some more positive move and the crypto market starting to recover however the demand for the new RTX 20×0 series and not only for the RTX 2060 probably won’t be big for sure.

Seems like Bitmain is resorting to tactics we do not like for their Bitmain Z9 Mini ASIC miners in order to push the sales of the new bigger Antminer Z9 SIC miner, like removing the options to overclock the newer batches of the devices. The initial Z9 Mini miners had a drop-down box that allowed you to easily select the operating frequency of the miner’s chips and since the Z9 Mini do overclock pretty well and work 100% stable with 50% increase in their mining performance it is something that you should do right after you get the device out of the box. The 10 K/sol Z9 Mini at 250W of power usage at the default 500 MHz can easily do 15 K/sol when overclocked to 700 MHz without problems at 350W and maybe even more if it manages to be stable at 725 MHz or even 750 MHz, though not every unit manages to do so.

How do we overclock the new Antminer Z9 Mini miners from the web-based interface when under Miner Configuration, Advanced Settings all we see under the Frequency drop down menu is Balanced that represents the default frequency of 500 MHz? It is actually really easy as what Bitmain seems to do in order to limit the overclocking functionality was to remove the options from the HTML code of the page, so you just have to edit the source code of that page and add the options yourself in order to be able to set the clocks higher. There are number of ways you can do that, but the easiest one probably is to just edit the page code on the fly using Chrome or Firefox and Save&Apply the settings directly, so the device starts to operate at the higher frequency. What you have to do is hover the drop-down box where only Balance is available and right click on it selecting Inspect or Inspect Element. You will see that there is a commented option for Turbo set at 550 MHz as a value, you can edit this one by removing the commenting brackets at the start and end of the line or even just change the frequency of the Balance option to let us say 700 MHz. Just select the line of code and right click on it choosing Edit as HTML from the pop-up menu and do the needed changes.

When you finish editing the line you just apply the changes and you will see them active on the webpage immediately, do not worry, the change is just temporary, so that you can click on Save&Apply to get the new operating frequency saved in the miner’s config file. After the page reloads the changes you have made to the code will be gone as they are not permanently saved. Our advice is to start at 700 MHz as everything should be stable there and you might have to manually increase the cooling fan speed to have thing run cooler and stable as you overclock. Then you can try increasing the operating frequency further to 725 MHz and 750 MHz in order to see if you can squeeze some extra performance with the device remaining stable.

The Bitmain AntMiner Z9 Mini running at 700 MHz should be able to produce about 15 K/sol average hashrate without any problems and continue to run without errors 24/7, so you an get 50% performance increase with just 100W of power usage extra for free. You can guess that Bitmain doesn’t want you to have that bonus and that is why they probably have removed the option from the web interface, though again it is really easy to still overclock your miners despite that. The interesting question here is if the new bigger and more powerful AntMiner Z9 ASIC miner will be just as easy to overclock and as overclockable at the Z9 Mini, or maybe Bimain will have it overclocked already when they ship the device…

Download an older Antminer Z9 Mini firmware that works with the OC trick if your mini comes with newer locked firmware…


top