trollcoin-logo

Trollcoin (TROLL) is a digital currency that came into existence on February 14, 2014. TrollCoins are stored in a digital wallet on your PC, Mac, Android Smartphone, or on cloud services running a wallet on your behlaf, with separate user accounts keeping track of individual balances, such as TrollCoinBOT & digital currency exchanges. TrollCoin transfers are blazing fast, your transaction completes & verifies in about 1 minute.

Approximately 338 Million TrollCoin exist today, more coins are continuously mined at a rate halving periodically until the final 900th Million TrollCoin has been mined or staked. At that point, no additional coins will be created as set forth by the TrollCoin protocol. Anyone can mine TrollCoin using their computer or specialized mining hardware. You can also earn TrollCoin by keeping Trolls in your wallet & leaving online to support the network & earn periodical rewards in an automatic process called Staking.

Website:
http://trollcoinbase.com/

Block Explorer:
https://chainz.cryptoid.info/troll/

Coin Specifications

  • Scrypt Algorithm (PoW) + Static Proof of Stake v3
  • PoW Initial Reward per Block: 125 TROLL
  • PoW Target Spacing: 60 Seconds
  • PoW Difficulty Retarget: 10 Blocks
  • Full Confirmation: 10 Blocks
  • PoS Reward: 7 TROLL Static Reward
  • PoS Target Spacing: 64 Seconds
  • PoS Difficulty Retarget: 10 Blocks
  • PoS Min: 1 Hour, Max: Unlimited
  • Total Max Coins: 900,000,000 TROLL
  • Block Size: 7MB

Wallet:
Windows
Mac OS

Source Code:
at GitHub

Ports:
– RPC Port: 17000
– P2P Port: 15000

Mining Pools:
http://troll.nation-wars.com/

Coin Exchanges:
Bleutrade

antminer-u1-idle-power-consumption

If you are using Bitmain AntMiner U1 USB Bitcoin ASIC miners there is something important that you should be well aware of in order to get the maximum performance and ensure optimal stability on the long run for these devices. Obviously we are going to be talking about power consumption and usage of these small ASIC miners that are designed to be powered by USB. The manufacturer has rated them at 2 watt power consumption from the USB port with a hasrate of 1.6 GH/s and tha is leaving you about 0.5W headroom for overclocking before reaching the maximum power that a normal USB 2.0 port can provide you with. But we decided to check if the Bitmain rating is rally true and to see for ourselves what is the actual power consumption of the AntiMiner U1 devices. As you can see on the photo above the power usage of the U1 miner is just 0.086A at 5V or a total of 0.43 watts is what you get with the device connected to a PC, but with no mining software running.

antminer-u1-cool-hot-power-consumption

As soon as you fire up cgminer or another compatible mining software and the AntMiner U1 starts working at 1.6 GH/s the power consumption increases significantly that what you get in idle mode. At first we’ve measured 0.385A current used or about 1.925 watts – a bit below the manufacturer’s rating, however this is the power usage while the device is still cool. Just a few minutes later since everything gets hotter (thermal images) after the AntMiner U1 starts operating and the power usage increases along with the temperature of the chips. In just about 10 minutes after starting to mine with the device the current usage increases to 0.405A or a total of 2.025W of power, something that does not seem that much higher at first, but as you start to overclock the device you will notice that the gap between a well cooled AntMiner U1 and a very hot miner increases. The problem is that the higher power consumption leads to more heat and can also result in less performance when overclocking.

Here are the results we’ve got as a power consumption of the AntMiner U1 device connected on a USB 2.0 port. Have in mind that USB 2.0 ports have a standard limit on maximum current they can provide to a connected device of 0.5A or 2.5W in total and this can lead to lower performance you can get when overclocking as you might be hitting the interface power limit and not the device’s:

1.6 GH/s – 0.405A
1.8 GH/s – 0.456A
2.0 GH/s – 0.505A
2.2 GH/s – ~~~~~~

We have moved the AntMiner U1 to a USB port to contnue with our overclocking experiments. Have in mind that USB 3.0 ports have an increased limit of the current they can supply to a device of 0.9A at 5V or 4.5W of power, so we could continue to overclock the USB ASIC further:

2.2 GH/s – 0.568A
2.4 GH/s – 0.633A
2.6 GH/s – 0.701A
2.8 GH/s – ~~~~~~

As you can see from the results above hitting 2.2 GH/s on a USB 2.0 port was not possible as we were hitting the limit of the power the interface can provide already at 2 GH/s. Moving to USB 3.0 we could squeeze up to 2.6 GH/s by increasing the operating frequency of the device and having more power available to use from the USB port. Have in mind that overclocking the device requires an adequate cooling to be provided, so you need to be prepared for that before starting to go past the “stock” 1.6 GH/s hashrate. As you can see from our results the maximum we could get was below the maximum power the USB 3.0 interface can provide, the reason for that is that for higher performance you would also have to increase the voltage that the processor of the device operates at (default 0.8V) in order for it to continue working fine at a higher frequency. This can be done by replacing two resistors on the device and the procedure is described in the AntMiner U1 manual. Have in mind though that increasing the voltage can damage the device, so do have in mind should you decide to go for a hardware modification for even higher performance. Increasing the voltage will also seriously increase the power consumption and will require even better cooling in order not to overheat the miner!

To download the Bitmain AntMiner U1 manual for additional details about overclocking…

cexio-bitcoin-commodity-exchange-test

The Bitcoin Cloud Hashing service CEX.IO is currently down for an hour for a scheduled maintenance (3PM-4PM GMT). This downtime includes only the CEX cloud mining services that should be restored and the miners with cloud hashrate should be compensated with brief higher hashrate than they actually have purchased as the CEX does normally when there is downtime. The maintenance mode should continue for an hour and after that everything should be back to normal. The Ghash.io mining pool is fully operational and you can use it with dedicated miners if you have any during the maintenance period.

Update: Everything is back to normal now and you should’ve received slight boost for a bit in your hashrate to be compensated for the downtime.

For more information about the cloud service and to try Bitcoin Cloud Mining at CEX.IO…

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