Posts Tagged ‘Ethereum miner

Team Red Miner is a performance optimized cryptocurrency miner for AMD GPUs with support for lyra2rev3, lyra2z, phi2, CryptoNight v8 (CNv2) and CryptoNight R (CNv4), X16 variants, MTP, Cuckarood29 and Cuckatoo31 and now adding Ethash support as well in the latest 0.6 release. The miner is available for both Windows and Linux operating systems, a closed source software with 2.5% to 3% development fee built-in for all algos except Ethash, for Ethash on Polaris GPUs the dev fee is 0.75% and on all other GPUs is 1.0%.

A quick test of the Team Red Miner 0.6.0 for mining ETH (current DAG 299) on AMD Radeon RX 580 8GB GPUs has shown hashrate very similar to what other Ethash miners are capable of delivering on the same hardware, so performance wise things seem to be very good. Of course why to switch from one Ethash miner that you might be already familiar with such as Claymore’s Dual Miner to another that has just introduced support… that is up to you to decide, though you should give it a try.

To download and try the latest Team Red Miner 0.6.0 with Ethash support…

ethminer-cuda-new

Genoil, the developer of the Ethminer fork with Nvidia CUDA support (source) has implemented some updates to the code of the project contributed by SP and tpruvot that reduce the load on the CPU when the miner is running. Also the default worksize has been increased form 64 to 128, but other than that there should be no changes affecting the performance of the miner. The reduction of CPU usage may come at the cost of slight hashrate drop, but there is a command line parameter now that you can use to stick with the higher CPU load and get the slightly higher performance --high-cpu-load, so it is up to you to decide. We have updated our package with Geth and Ethminer for OpenCL and CUDA with the latest version of the Ethminer CUDA binary for Windows (requires 64-bit Windows), so you can download and try it. The Ethminer CUDA fork should work on Compute 2.0 or newer GPUs, we have tested it with a Compute 2.1 and it is working fine, but don’t forget that you can run Ethminer in OpenCL mode as well on Nvidia-based video cards and not only on AMD if you are having trouble with the CUDA support or the hashrate you get is lower as compared to OpenCL.

Download the updated Ethminer CUDA fork compiled for Windows and ready to be used…

ethpool-no-new-users-accepted

Mining for Ethereum’s Ether (ETH) coins is turning out to be a problem as it is still in its very early stages, it is still hard for non-advanced users to get started with it. Evven when you follow a guide like our guide on How to Mine Ethereum on Windows yuo can get to another challenge like the mining pool refusing your connections. This has happened today with the ethpool stopping to accept new miners resulting in connections for users trying to use new wallet addresses getting refused while all older miners can still continue to use the pool. The problem here is that ethpool is still the only Ethereum mining pool, so now the only alternative for new users is to solo mine – we have prepared a guide on getting started with Solo GPU Mining Ethereum on Windows. With solo mining however the risks are higher, but the rewards can also be higher if you turn up lucky, there is however no point in solo mining with CPU as the hashrate will be pretty low and you will need a lot of luck to hit a block.

We have updated our mining package that includes the geth client for generating a local Ethereum wallet and also needed for solo mining to the latest version, it is compiled for 64-bit Windows. The package also includes two versions of ethminer (also 64-bit only), the standard one with CPU and OpenCL mining as a part of cpp-ethereum and a second one forked to support CUDA as well. Note that the CUDA version can be used to mine with the CPU, OpenCL and CUDA and you should be are able to use OpenCL on Nvidia GPU’s as well. The CUDA miner should work on GPUs with Compute 2.0 or later, but if you are having trouble running the CUDA miner you can try with the OpenCL one, the resulting hashrate should not be much different between the two implementations. Also we have discovered that adding the parameter “–gpu-batch-size 20” (without the quotes) to the CUDA version of ethminer (works with the OpenCL setting of that miner as well) can increase a bit the performance you get, so we have added it by default to the example bat files for the CUDA version. The hashrate improvement is actually pretty small on Nvidia GPU’s, but on AMD cards using OpenCL it can give better results. We got up from about 24.4 MHS on Radeon R9 280X to about 26.5 MHS by adding the parameter, be aware however that this parameter is only available in the CUDA fork of ethminer.

Another interesting tip regarding issues with low hashrate, either local or reported by the pool, is to try deleting the DAG files that are being generated the first time you run ethminer. Sometimes when you are playing with different settings for the miner it seems that the DAG files may not work that well, so deleting them and having the miner generate them again with the latest settings can bring back the usual performance. So if the locally reported hashrate by the miner suddenly drops or the pool reports only a small fraction of what your total hashrate should normally be you can try deleting the DAG files and having them generated again. On Windows you can find them located in the AppData / Local / Ethash folder under your computer’s Username in the Users folder (example: C:/Users/myPC/AppData/Local/ Ethash). You may need to enable the showing of hidden system files first in order to see the needed folders in Windows Explorer if you have not enabled it already.

Download the latest geth and ethminer compiled for Windows and ready to be used…


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