Posts Tagged ‘GPU mining

A week ago there was a fork for the BitCash (BITC) project in order to switch to the new X16Rv2 PoW algorithm. Due to some issues however GPU mining ended up not working up properly, so only CPU solo mining was possible for a week and another fork was planned to fix the problem. Today the new fork has happened and the good news is that X16Rv2 GPU mining is now possible after the successful fork. Due to the fork the difficulty of mining BITC is currently lower and you might want to take advantage of this and play around with the T-Rex miner and the X16Rv2 algorithm if you have some Nvidia GPUs and wondering what to mine. As for a good pool where you can mine BitCash on, you might want to check out IceMining or alternatively the second option is to go for GOS.cx

There is a new fork of GRIN based on the MimbleWimble protocol called Epic Cash (EPIC) that has officially launched their blockchain a day or so ago. EPIC can be CPU, GPU, and ASIC-mined with 3 different algorithms available for each type of hardware and block rewards are distributed according to a schedule that balances wide distribution with long-term security. One of the main goals of the project is to offer high level of privacy to the users with a monetary policy very similar to that of Bitcoin (BTC). This includes a maximum supply of 21 million coins and a higher initial emission in order to reach and synchronize with Bitcoin in terms of available coins in a couple of years time frame. The so called Epic Singularity will happe in 2028 when the Epic circulating supply intersects the number of Bitcoin’s circulating supply, at which point Epic Cash adopts the Bitcoin block reward and halving pattern. Until then the starting block reward is 16 coins halving around every year initially and then around every two until it reaches a halving every 4 years.

The Epic Cash blockchain is initially available to CPU, GPU, and ASIC miners by using three respective hashing algorithms: RandomX, ProgPow, and CuckAToo31+ wih different percent distribution for each one starting with higher CPU advantage and slowly transitioning to GPUs and then ASICs. Since for the moment there are not publicly available CuckAToo31+ ASIC miners the algo is available for GPUs as well, however work is being done by multiple manufacturers and maybe by the end of this year or early next year such devices might become available on the market (optimistically speaking). So far, so good the project looks interesting and promising, though not everything seems to be that great for non-advanced users interested in mining EPIC.

First of all EPIC can currently be only solo mined and since it is based on GRIN codebase, just like GRIN it is not that user friendly running and mining it. LINUX users have a better advantage as for example the CUDA GPU miner is not officially available for Windows yet and the OpenCL one is giving trouble and using third party ProgPow miners for solo mining the coin is also a kind of a challenge with no pool available yet. CPU mining is working pretty well with the available miner, but solo mining with the already high difficulty could be a challenge for most users to mine even one block. mining pools should be coming out shortly with talk about icemining probably being the first on the train, though nothing official about that yet.

If you are interested in checking out more details about the Epic Cash (EPIC) project…

It seems that Asus is upping their mining motherboard game with a successor of their Asus B250 Mining Expert Motherboard with 19 PCI-E Slots. The new mining motherboard is called Asus H370 Mining Master and comes with support for up to 20 GPUs using direct PCIe over USB connections. The presence of USB connectors directly fitted on the motherboard simplifies connectivity by letting USB riser cables plug directly into the PCB and this direct connection is sturdier than using a PCIe card, with less chance of inadvertent disconnects, and it also reduces the total number of parts in your rig.

You may notice that aside the 20 USB 3.0 connectors on the motherboard there is also a single PCI-E x16 slot, however this does not mean you are able to have a 21st GPU. The PCI-E x16 slot and the first USB 3.0 connector are labeled A01 and that share the same PCI-E lane, so you can have only one of them working with a GPU, not both at the same time.

The Asus H370 Mining Master motherboard includes a suite of diagnostic features designed to make your farm easier to diagnose and manage in case of problems. A very useful one is the GPU State Detection (available in the Asus B250 Mining Expert as well), which scans the system at boot and indicates whether each riser port is empty, connected to a functional graphics card, or experiencing problems. The updated State Detection GUI clearly identifies the location and status of each port along with the alphanumeric code that identifies it. To further streamline troubleshooting, the board will ship with matching alphanumeric labels to stick onto corresponding riser cards. You’ll be able to quickly look at the labels to find flagged GPUs instead of being forced to trace the path of cables connected to affected ports.

Asus H370 Mining Master Specifications:
– Size: ATX, 12″ x 9.1″
– Socket: LGA 1151 for Intel 8th Gen Core, Pentium, and Celeron processors
– Memory: 2 x DIMMs (max. 32GB), DDR4 2666/2400/2133MHz, Non-ECC, unbuffered memory
– Slots: 1 x PCIe x16
– Storage: 2 x Serial ATA 6Gbps
– Networking: 1 x Intel Gigabit LAN
– GPU riser ports: 20 x PCIe over USB (vertical)
– USB ports: 6 x USB 3.1 Gen 1, 4 x USB 2.0/1.1
– Other: 1 x COM header

Efficient mining also requires a few UEFI tweaks that are consolidated in a special Mining Mode on the motherboard. The PCIe lanes are set to run at Gen 1 speeds to improve compatibility and stability with USB riser cards, the Above 4G Decoding is enabled, which is critical for supporting lots of graphics cards, and Launch CSM is disabled, which lets the motherboard and graphics UEFIs synchronize with each other. Mining Mode is activated by default, so you’re ready to go right out of the box, without having to mess around in the firmware interface… after all this is a dedicated mining motherboard and it should be ready out of the box.

Just like the predecessor B250 Mining Expert the new H370 Mining Master comes with a trio of 24-pin primary power supply connectors, so you can connect to up to three PSUs simultaneously. Each one is tied to a separate bank of riser ports, allowing you to scale up the number of GPUs gradually and add more power as needed. Some motherboards require modifications and special startup sequences to run on multiple PSUs, but the Master is tailored for the task. All that’s required is for the PCIe power connector on each graphics cards to be plugged into the same power supply as the corresponding riser port.

There is no information yet about pricing and availability of the motherboard, just that Asus plans to have it be available later this year. However Asus H370 Mining Master will be demonstrated running at full capacity in a custom mining rig being unveiled at Computex 2018 in Taipei, Taiwan from June 5-9.


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